Pliny the Elder, Natural History (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Plin. Nat.].
<<Plin. Nat. 23.57 Plin. Nat. 23.58 (Latin) >>Plin. Nat. 23.59

23.58 CHAP. 58.—THE COMPOSITION CALLED STOMATICE: FOURTEEN REMEDIES.

With the sour pomegranate a medicament is made, which is known as "stomatice," and is extremely good for affections of the mouth, nostrils, and ears, dimness of sight, films upon the eyes, [Note] diseases of the generative organs, corrosive sores called "nomæ," and fleshy excrescences in ulcers; it is useful, also, as an antidote to the venom of the sea-hare. [Note] The following, is the method of making it: the rind is taken off the fruit, and the pips are pounded, after which the juice is boiled down to one-third, and then mixed with saffron, split alum, [Note] myrrh, and Attic honey, the proportions being half a pound of each.

Some persons have another way of making it: a number of sour pomegranates are pounded, after which the juice is boiled down in a new cauldron to the consistency of honey. This composition is used for various affections of the generative organs and fundament, and, indeed, all those diseases which are treated with lycium. [Note] It is employed, also, for the cure of purulent discharges from the ears, incipient defluxions of the eyes, and red spots upon the hands. Branches of the pomegranate have the effect of repelling the attacks of serpents. [Note] Pomegranate rind, boiled in wine and applied, is a cure for chilblains. A pomegranate, boiled down to onethird in three heminæ of wine, is a cure for griping pains in

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the bowels and for tape-worm. [Note] A pomegranate, put in anew earthen pot tightly covered and burnt in a furnace, and then pounded and taken in wine, arrests looseness of the bowels, and dispels griping pains in the stomach.



Pliny the Elder, Natural History (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Plin. Nat.].
<<Plin. Nat. 23.57 Plin. Nat. 23.58 (Latin) >>Plin. Nat. 23.59

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