Pliny the Elder, Natural History (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Plin. Nat.].
<<Plin. Nat. 9.88 Plin. Nat. 10.1 (Latin) >>Plin. Nat. 10.2

10.1 CHAP. 1. (1.)—THE OSTRICH.

THE history of the birds [Note] follows next, the very largest of which, and indeed almost approaching to the nature of quad- rupeds, is the ostrich [Note] of Africa or [Note] Æthiopia. This bird exceeds in height a man sitting on horseback, and can surpass him in swiftness, as wings have been given to aid it in running; in other respects ostriches cannot be considered as birds, and do not raise themselves from the earth. They have cloven talons, very similar to the hoof [Note] of the stag; with these they fight, and they also employ them in seizing stones for the purpose of

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throwing [Note] at those who pursue them. They have the marvellous property of being able to digest [Note] every substance without distinction, but their stupidity [Note] is no less remarkable; for although the rest of their body is so large, they imagine, when they have thrust their head and neck into a bush, that the whole of the body is concealed. Their eggs [Note] are prized on account of their large size, and are employed as vessels for certain purposes, while the feathers of the wing and tail are used as ornaments for the crest and helmet of the warrior.



Pliny the Elder, Natural History (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Plin. Nat.].
<<Plin. Nat. 9.88 Plin. Nat. 10.1 (Latin) >>Plin. Nat. 10.2

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