Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Cic. Fam.].
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9.7

CDLX (F IX, 7)

TO M. TERENTIUS VARRO (AT TUSCULUM) ROME (MAY)

I was dining with Seius when a letter was delivered to each of us from you. Yes, I really think it is high time. For as to the personal motive in what I said before, I will own the cunning of my heart—I wanted you to be somewhere near in case of anything good turning up: "two heads," [Note] you know. At present, seeing that it is all over and done, we should not hesitate to go over, horse, foot, and artillery! For when I heard about L. Caesar the younger, I said to myself: What will he do for me, his sire? [Note] Accordingly, I do not cease dining out with the members of the party now in power. What else should I do? One must go with the times. But a truce to jesting, especially as we have nothing to laugh at: With fearsome tumult shakes wild Afric's shore. [Note] Accordingly, there is nothing "undesirable" [Note] which I do not

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fear. But, in answer to your question as to when, by what road, and whither [Note] —I as yet know nothing. You suggest Baiae—but some doubt whether he will not come by way of Sardinia. [Note] For that particular one of his estates he has not inspected as yet. It is the worst of them all, [Note] nevertheless he does not despise it. For my part, I am on the whole more inclined to think that he will come through Sicily to Velia: but we shall know directly; for Dolabella is on his way home: he, I suppose, will be our instructor: "Scholars are often wiser than their teachers." [Note] But nevertheless, if I can ascertain what you have settled, I will accommodate my policy to yours before anyone else's. Wherefore I am anxious for a letter from you.



Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Cic. Fam.].
<<Cic. Fam. 9.6 Cic. Fam. 9.7 (Latin) >>Cic. Fam. 9.8

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