Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Cic. Att.].
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4.11

CXXIII (A IV, 11)

TO ATTICUS (AT ROME) CUMAE (APRIL)

I was delighted with your two letters which I received together on the 26th. Go on with the story. I long to know all the facts of what you write about. Also I should like you to find out what this means: you can do so from Demetrius. Pompey told me that he was expecting Crassus in his Alban villa on the 27th: that as soon as he arrived, they were going at once to Rome to settle accounts with the publicani. I asked, "During the gladiatorial exhibitions?" He answered, "Before they were begun." What that means I wish you would send me word either at once, if you know, or when he has reached Rome. I am engaged here in devouring books with the aid of that wonderful fellow Dionysius, [Note] for, by Hercules, that is what he seems to me to be. He sends compliments to you and all your party.

-- 254 --

No bliss so great as knowing all that is.
Wherefore indulge my thirst for knowledge by telling what happened on the first and on the second day of the shows: what about the Censors, [Note] what about Appius, [Note] what about that she—Appuleius of the people ? [Note] Finally, pray write me word what you are doing yourself. For, to tell the truth, revolutions don't give me so much pleasure as a letter from you. I took no one out of town with me except Dionysius: yet I am in no fear of wanting conversation—so delightful do I find that youth. Pray give my book to Lucceius. [Note] I send you the book of Demetrius of Magnesia, [Note] that there may be a messenger on the spot to bring me back a letter from you.



Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Cic. Att.].
<<Cic. Att. 4.10 Cic. Att. 4.11 (Latin) >>Cic. Att. 4.12

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