Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Cic. Att.].
<<Cic. Att. 13.19 Cic. Att. 13.20 (Latin) >>Cic. Att. 13.21

13.20

DCXXXII (A XIII, 20)

TO ATTICUS (AT ROME) ARPINUM (2 JULY)

I have received a letter of consolation from Caesar, dated 31st of May, at Hispalis. [Note] I did not understand the nature of the bill published for extending the boundaries of the City: I should much like to know about it. [Note] I am glad that Torquatus is satisfied with what I have done for him, and I will not cease adding to those services. To the speech for Ligarius it is not now either possible to add a clause about

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Tubero's wife and step-daughter [Note] —for the speech is by this time very widely known-nor do I wish to annoy Tubero: for he is astonishingly sensitive. You certainly had a good audience! For my part, though I get on very comfortably in this place, I nevertheless long to see you. So I shall be with you as I arranged. I suppose you have met my brother. I am therefore anxious to know what you said to him. As to "reputation," I am not at all inclined to trouble myself, though I did say foolishly in that letter that it was "better than anything else." For it is not a thing for me to be anxious about. And don't you see how truly philosophical this sentiment is—"that every man is bound not to depart a nail's breadth from the strict path of conscience"? Do you think that it is all for nothing that I am now engaged in these compositions ? [Note] I would not have you feel distressed by that remark, which amounted to nothing. For I return to the same point again. Do you suppose that I care for anything in the whole question except not to be untrue to my past? I am striving, forsooth, to maintain my reputation in the courts! Not in them I trust! I only wish I could bear my home sorrows as easily as I can disregard that! But do you think that I had set my heart on something that has not been accomplished? Self-praise is no commendation: still, though I cannot fail to approve of what I did then, [Note] yet I can with a good grace refrain from troubling myself about it, as in fact I do. But I have said too much on a trivial subject.

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Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Cic. Att.].
<<Cic. Att. 13.19 Cic. Att. 13.20 (Latin) >>Cic. Att. 13.21

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