Plautus, Curculio (English) (XML Header) [genre: poetry; drama; comedy] [word count] [Pl. Cur.].
<<Pl. Cur. 240 Pl. Cur. 292 (Latin) >>Pl. Cur. 356

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278 [Note] . Let's listen from here what he's about.

Phaedromus

I think it's as well. They stand aside.

280 Enter Curculio, at a distance, walking fast. Curculio

to himself.Known or unknown, make way for me, while here I execute my commission; fly all of you, be off, and get out of the way, lest I should hurt any person in my speed with my head, or elbow, or breast, or with my knee. So suddenly now am I charged with a business of quickness and despatch. And be there no person ever so opulent to stop me in my way, neither general [Note] , nor any tyrant [Note] , nor market-officer 285 [Note] , nor demarch [Note] nor comarch 286 [Note] , with their honors so great, but that down he goes, and tumbles head first from the footpath into the carriage-road. And then those Grecians with their cloaks, who walk about with covered heads, who go loaded beneath their cloaks with books, and with baskets 289 [Note] , they loiter together, and engage in gossipping among themselves, the gad-abouts 290 [Note] ; you may always see them enjoying themselves in the hot liquor-shops 292 [Note] ; when they have scraped up some trifle, with their covered pates they are drinking mulled wine, sad and maudlin they depart: if I stumble upon them here, from every single one of them I'll squeeze out a belch from their pearled-barley diet 295 [Note] . And then those servants of your dainty townsmen 296 [Note] , who are playing at catch-ball in the road, both throwers and catchers, all of them I'll pitch under foot. Would they avoid a mishap, why then, let them keep at home.

Phaedromus

apart.He points out aright, he only requires that he should speak with authority; for such manners are in vogue in the present day, such at present are the slaves; really, control cannot be held over them.

Curculio

to himself.Is there any one, I wonder, who can point out to me Phædromus, my good Genius? The matter is of such pressing nature, I really must meet with the man this instant.

Palinurus

apart.He's looking for you.

Phaedromus

apart. What if we accost him? Aloud. Hallo! Curculio, I want you.

Curculio

looking round.Who's calling me? Who's mentioning my name?

Phaedromus

One who wishes to meet with you.

Curculio

seeing him.You don't wish more for me than I wish for you.

Phaedromus

O my own ready occasion, Curculio, much longed-for, greetings to you.

Curculio

Greetings to you.

Phaedromus

I'm glad that you have arrived safe; give me your right hand. How stand my hopes? Troth now, prithee, do speak out.

Curculio

To you, troth now, prithee, do speak out, how stand my own. Makes curious gestures.

Phaedromus

What's the matter with you?

Curculio

A dimness is beginning to come, my knees are failing through fasting.

Phaedromus

I' faith, through lassitude, I think.

Curculio

staggering.Support me, prithee, do support me.

Phaedromus

See how pale he has turned; will you give him a seat, for him to be seated at once, and an ewer with some water? Will you make haste, this very instant?

Curculio

I'm faint.

Phaedromus

Would you like some water?

Curculio

If it's full of bits 312 [Note] of meat, prithee, give it me to swallow down, i' faith.

Phaedromus

Woe be to that head of yours.

Curculio

Troth now, prithee do give me cause to rejoice at my arrival 313 [Note] .

Phaedromus

begins to fan him.By all means.

Curculio

Prithee, what's this you're about.

Phaedromus

Some air.

Curculio

Really, for my part, I don't want a breath to be raised.

Phaedromus

What then?

Curculio

To eat, that I may rejoice on my arrival.

Phaedromus

May Jupiter and the Deities confound you.

Curculio

I'm quite undone; I can hardly see; my mouth is bitter; my teeth, I find, are blunted



Plautus, Curculio (English) (XML Header) [genre: poetry; drama; comedy] [word count] [Pl. Cur.].
<<Pl. Cur. 240 Pl. Cur. 292 (Latin) >>Pl. Cur. 356

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