Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 9.2.7 Str. 9.2.13 (GreekEnglish) >>Str. 9.2.17

9.2.11Also Mycalessus, a village, is in the Tanagraean territory. It is situated on the road that leads from Thebes to Chalcis; and in the Boeotian dialect it is called Mycalettus. And Harma is likewise in the Tanagraean territory; it is a deserted village near Mycalettus, and received its name from the chariot of Amphiaraüs, and is a different place from the Harma in Attica, which is near Phylë, a deme of Attica bordering on Tanagra. [Note] Here originated the proverb, "when the lightning flashes through Harma"; for those who are called the Pythaistae look in the general direction of Harma, in accordance with an oracle, and note any flash of lightning in that direction, and then, when they see the lightning flash, take the offering to Delphi. [Note] They would keep watch for three months, for three days and nights each month, from the altar of Zeus Astrapaeus; [Note] this altar is within the walls [Note] between the Pythium and the Olympium. [Note] In regard to the Harma in Boeotia, some say that Amphiaraus fell in the battle out of his chariot [Note] near the place where his temple now is, and that the chariot was drawn empty to the place which bears the same name; others say that the chariot of Adrastus, when he was in flight, was smashed to pieces there, but that Adrastus safely escaped on Areion. [Note] But Philochorus [Note] says that Adrastus was saved by the inhabitants of the village, and that on this account they obtained equal rights of citizenship from the Argives.

9.2.12To anyone returning from Thebes to Argos, [Note] Tanagra is on the left; and [Note] . . . is situated on the right. And Hyria, [Note] also, belongs to the Tanagraean territory now, though in earlier times it belonged to the Theban territory. Hyria is the scene of the myth of Hyrieus, and of the birth of Orion, of which Pindar speaks in his dithyrambs; [Note] it is situated near Aulis. Some say that Hysiae is called Hyria, belonging to the Parasopian country [Note] below Cithaeron, near Erythrae, in the interior, and that it is a colony of the Hyrieans and was founded by Nycteus, the father of Antiope. There is also a Hysiae in the Argive territory, a village; and its inhabitants are called Hysiatae. The Erythrae in Ionia is a colony of this Erythrae. And Heleon, also, is a village belonging to Tanagra, having been so named from the "hele." [Note]

9.2.13After Salganeus one comes to Anthedon, a city with a harbor; and it is the last city on that part of the Boeotian seaboard which is opposite to Euboea, as the poet says, "Anthedon at the extremity." [Note] As one proceeds a little farther, however, there are still two small towns belonging to the Boeotians: Larymna, near which the Cephissus empties, and, still farther on, Halae, which bears the same name as the Attic demes. [Note] Opposite this seaboard is situated, it is said, the Aegae [Note] in Euboea, in which is the temple of the Aegaean Poseidon, which I have mentioned before. [Note] The distance across the strait from Anthedon to Aegae is one hundred and twenty stadia, but from the other places it is much less. The temple is situated on a high mountain, where there was once a city. And Orobiae [Note] also is near Aegae. In the Anthedonian territory is Mount Messapius, [Note] named after Messapus, who, when he came into Iapygia, called the country Messapia. [Note] Here, too, is the scene of the myth of Glaucus, the Anthedonian, who is said to have changed into a sea-monster. [Note]

9.2.14Near Anthedon, and belonging to Boeotia, is a place that is esteemed sacred, and contains traces of a city, Isus, as it is called, with the first syllable pronounced short. Some, however, think that the verse should be written, "sacred Isus and Anthedon at the extremity," [Note] lengthening the first syllable by poetic licence on account of the meter, [Note] instead of "sacred Nisa," [Note] for Nisa is nowhere to be seen in Boeotia, as Apollodorus says in his work On Ships; [Note] so that Nisa could not be the correct reading, unless by "Nisa" the poet means "Isus"; for there was a city Nisa bearing the same name in the territory of Megara, whose inhabitants emigrated to the foothills of Cithaeron, but it has now disappeared. Some, however, think that we should write "sacred Creusa," taking the poet to mean the Creusa of today, the naval station of the Thespians, which is situated in the Crisaean Gulf; but others think that we should read "sacred Pharae." Pharae is one of the "Four United Villages" in the neighborhood of Tanagra, which are: Heleon, Harma, Mycalessus, and Pharae. And still others write as follows: "sacred Nysa." And Nysa is a village in Helicon. [Note] Such, then, is the seaboard facing Euboea.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 9.2.7 Str. 9.2.13 (GreekEnglish) >>Str. 9.2.17

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