Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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9.2.11

Mycalessus is a village in the Tanagrian district. It lies upon the road from Thebes to Chalcis. It is called in the Bœotian dialect Mycalettus. Harma, also, an uninhabited village in the Tanagrian territory, derives its name from the

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chariot (ἅμα) of Amphiaraus, and is a different place from Harma in Attica, near Phyle, [Note] a demus of Attica bordering upon Tanagra. There the proverb originated, When it has lightened through Harma,
The Pythaïstæ, as they are called, signify, by the order of an oracle, the occurrence of any lightning when they are looking in the direction of Harma, and despatch the sacrifice to Delphi whenever it is observed. They were to keep watch for three months, and for three days and nights in each month, at the altar of Jupiter Astrapius, or Dispenser of lightning. This altar is in the wall, between the Pythium and the Olympium. Respecting the Bœotian Harma, some say, that Amphiaraus fell in battle out of his chariot, [harma,] near the spot where his temple now stands, and that the chariot was drawn empty to the place, which bears the same name [Harma]. [Note] Others say, that the chariot of Adrastus, in his flight, was there dashed in pieces, but that lie himself escaped on his horse Areion. According to Philochorus, his life was preserved by the inhabitants of the village; in consequence of which they obtained among the Argives the right of citizenship. 9.2.12

On going from Thebes to Argos, [Note] on the left hand is Tanagra; and [near the road] on the right lies Hyria. Hyria now belongs to the Tanagrian territory, but formerly to the Thebais. Here Hyrieus is fabled to have lived, and here is the scene of the birth of Orion, which Pindar mentions in the dithyrambics. It is situated near Aulis. Some persons say that Hysiæ is called Hyria, which belongs to Parasopia, situated below Cithæron, near Erythræ, in the inland parts; it is a colony of the Hyrienses, and was founded by Nycteus, the father of Antiope. There is also in the Argive territory a village, Hysiæ, the inhabitants of which are called Hysiatæ. Erythræ in Ionia is a colony of this Erythræ.

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Heleon, a Tanagrian village, has its name from (Hele) the marshes there. 9.2.13

After Salganeus is Anthedon, a city with a harbour, the last on the Bœotian coast towards Eubœa, as the poet says, Anthedon at the extremity. [Note]
Il. ii. 508.
As we proceed a little farther, there are besides two small towns, belonging to the Bœotians, Larymna, near which the Cephissus discharges its waters; and farther above, Halæ, of the same name as the Attic demus. Opposite to this coast is situated, it is said, ægæ [Note] in Eubœa, where is the temple of the ægæan Neptune, of which we have before spoken. There is a passage across from Anthedon to ægæ of 120 stadia, and from the other places much less than this. The temple is situated upon a lofty hill, where was once a city. Near ægæ was Orobiæ. [Note] In the Anthedonian territory is the mountain Messapius, [Note] which has its name from Messapus, who when he came into Iapygia called it Messapia. Here is laid the scene of the fable respecting the Anthedonian Glaucus, who, it is said, was transformed into a sea-monster. [Note] 9.2.14

Near Anthedon is a place called Isus, and esteemed sacred, belonging to Bœotia; it contains remains of a city, and the first syllable of Isus is short. Some persons are of opinion, that the verse ought to be written, ισόν τε ζαθέην ανθηδόνα τ ἐσχατόωσαν, The sacred Isus, and the extreme Anthedon,
lengthening the first syllable by poetical licence for the sake of the metre, instead of νῖσάν τε ζαθέην, The sacred Nisa;
for Nisa is not to be found anywhere in Bœotia, as Apollodorus says in his observations on the Catalogue of the Ships;

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so that Nisa could not stand in this passage, unless by Nisa Homer meant Isus, for there was a city Nisa, in Megaris, from whence Isus was colonized, situated at the base of Cithæron, but it exists no longer. [Note] Some however write κρεῦσιάν τε ζαθέην, The sacred Creusa,
meaning the present Creusa, the arsenal of the Thespieans, situated on the Crisæan Gulf. Others write the passage φαάς τε ζαθέας, The sacred Pharæ,
Pharæ is one of the four villages, (or Tetracomiæ,) near Tanagra, namely, Heleon, Harma, Mycalessus, Pharæ. Others again write the passage thus, νῦσάν τρ ζαθέηα The sacred Nysa.
Nysa is a village of Helicon.

Such then is the description of the sea-coast opposite Eubœa.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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