Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 9.2.28 Str. 9.2.33 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 9.2.40


Platææ, which the poet uses in the singular number, lies at the foot of Cithæron, between this mountain and Thebes, on the road to Athens and Megara; it is on the borders of Attica and Bœotia, for Eleutheræ is near, which some say belongs to Attica, others to Bœotia. We have said that the Asopus flows beside Plateæ. There the army of the Greeks entirely destroyed Mardonius and three hundred thousand Persians. They dedicated there a temple to Jupiter Eleutherius, and instituted gymnastic games, called Eleutheria, in which the victor was crowned. The tombs erected at the public expense, in honour of those who died in the battle, are to be seen there. In the Sicyonian district is a demus called Platææ, where the poet Mnasalces was born: the monument of Mnasalces of Platææ.
Glissas, [Note] Homer says, is a village on Mount Hypatus, which is near Teumessus and Cadmeia, in the Theban territory. * * * * * * * beneath is what is called the Aonian plain, which extends from Mount Hypatus [to Cadmeia?]. [Note]

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32. By these words of the poet, those who occupied under Thebes, [Note]
Il. ii. 505.
some understand a small town, called Under-Thebes, others Potniæ, for Thebes was abandoned after the expedition of the Epigoni, and took no part in the Trojan war. Others say that they did take part in it, but that they lived at that time under Cadmeia, in the plain country, after the incursion of the Epigoni, being unable to rebuild the Cadmeia. As Thebes was called Cadmeia, the poet says that the Thebans of that time lived under Thebes instead of under Cadmeia. 9.2.33

The Amphictyonic council usually assembled at Onchestus, in the territory of Haliartus, near the lake Copais, and the Teneric plain. It is situated on a height, devoid of trees, where is a temple of Neptune also without trees. For the poets, for the sake of ornament, called all sacred places groves, although they were without trees. Such is the language of Pindar, when speaking of Apollo: He traversed in his onward way the earth and sea; he stood upon the heights of the lofty mountains; he shook the caves in their deep recesses, and overthrew the foundations of the sacred groves or temples. As Alcæus is mistaken in the altering the name of the river Cuarius, so he makes a great error in placing Onchestus at the extremities of Helicon, whereas it is situated very far from this mountain. 9.2.34

The Teneric plain has its name from Tenerus. According to mythology, he was the son of Apollo and Melia, and declared the answers of the oracle at the mountain Ptoum, [Note] which, the same poet says, had three peaks: At one time he occupied the caves of the three-headed Ptoum;
and he calls Tenerus the prophet, dwelling in the temple, and having the same name as the soil on which it stands. "The Ptoum is situated above the Teneric plain, and the lake Copaïs, near Acræphium.

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Both the oracle and the mountain belonged to the Thebans.

Acrsephium [Note] itself is situated upon a height. This, it is said, is the place called Arne by the poet, having the same name as the Thessalian Arnē. 9.2.35

Some say that Arnē and Mideia were swallowed up by the lake. Zenodotus, however, when he writes the verse thus, they who occupied Ascra abounding with vines, [Note]
Il. ii. 507.
does not seem to have read Hesiod's description of his native country, and what has been said by Eudoxus, who relates things much more to the disparagement of Ascra. For how could any one believe that such a place could have been described by the poet as abounding with vines?
Neither are those persons in the right, who substitute in this passage Tarnē for Arnē, for there is not a place of the name of Tarne to be found in Bœotia, although there is in Lydia. Homer mentions it, Idomeneus then slew Phæstus, the son of Borus, the artificer, who came from the fruitful soil of Tarn. [Note] Besides Alalcomenæ and Tilphossium, which are near the lake, Chæroneia, Lebadia, and Leuctra, are worthy of notice. 9.2.36

The poet mentions Alalcomenæ, [Note] but not in the Cata logue;. the Argive Juno and Minerva of Alalcomenæ. [Note]
Il. iv. 8.
It has an ancient temple of Minerva, which is held in great veneration. It is said that this was the place of her birth, as Argos was that of Juno, and that Homer gave to both these goddesses designations derived from their native places. Perhaps for this reason he has not mentioned, in the Catalogue, the inhabitants; for having a sacred character, they were exempted from military service. Indeed the city has never suffered devastation by an enemy, although it is inconsiderable in size, and its position is weak, for it is situated in a plain.

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All in reverence to the goddess abstained from every act of violence; wherefore the Thebans, at the time of the expedition of the Epigoni, abandoning their own city, are said to have taken refuge here, and on the strong mountain above it, the Tilphossium. [Note] Below Tilphossium is the fountain Tilphossa, and the monument of Teiresias, who died there on the retreat.

Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 9.2.28 Str. 9.2.33 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 9.2.40

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