Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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9.1.8

The city of the Megarenses, after having experienced many changes, still subsists. It once had schools of philosophers, who had the name of the Megaric sect. They succeeded Euclides, the Socratic philosopher, who was by birth a Megarensian, in the same manner as the Eleiaci, among whom was Pyrrhon, who succeeded Phædon, the Eleian, who was also a Socratic philosopher, and as the Eretriaci succeeded Menedemus the Eretrean.

Megaris, like Attica, is very sterile, and the greater part of it is occupied by what are called the Oneii mountains, a kind of ridge, which, extending from the Scironides rocks to Bœotia and to Cithæron, separates the sea at Nisæa from that near Page, called the Alcyonian Sea. 9.1.9

In sailing from Nisæa to Attica there lie, in the course of the voyage, five small islands. Then succeeds Salamis, which is about 70, and according to others, 80, stadia in length. It has two cities of the same name. The ancient city, which looked towards ægina, and to the south, as æschylus has described it; ægina lies towards the blasts of the south:
it is uninhabited. The other is situated in a bay on a spot of a peninsular form contiguous to Attica. In former times it had other names, for it was called Sciras, and Cychreia, from certain heroes; from the former Minerva is called Sciras; hence also Scira, a place in Attica; Episcirosis, a religions rite; and Scirophorion, one of the months. From Cychreia

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the serpent Cychrides had its name, which Hesiod says Cychreus bred, and Eurylochus ejected, because it infested the island, but that Ceres admitted it into Eleusis, and it became her attendant. Salamis was called also Pityussa from pitys, the pine tree. The island obtained its renown from the æacidæ, who were masters of it, particularly from Ajax, the son of Telamon, and from the defeat of Xerxes by the Greeks in a battle on the coast, and by his flight to his own country. The æginetæ participated in the glory of that engagement, both as neighbours, and as having furnished a considerable naval force. [In Salamis is the river Bocarus, now called Bocalia.] [Note] 9.1.10

At present the Athenians possess the island Salamis. In former times they disputed the possession of it with the Megarians. Some allege, that Pisistratus, others that Solon, inserted in the Catalogue of Ships immediately after this verse, Ajax conducted from Salamis twelve vessels, [Note]
Il. ii. 557.
the following words, And stationed them by the side of the Athenian forces;
and appealed to the poet as a witness, that the island originally belonged to the Athenians. But this is not admitted by the critics, because many other lines testify the contrary. For why does Ajax appear at the extremity of the line not with the Athenians, but with the Thessalians under the command of Protesilaus; There were the vessels of Ajax, and Protesilaus. [Note]
Il. xiii. 681.
And Agamemnon, in the Review [Note] of the troops, found the son of Peteus, Menestheus, the tamer of horses, standing, and around were the Athenians skilful in war: near stood the wily Ulysses, and around him and at his side, the ranks of the Cephalleni [Note] and again, respecting Ajax and the Salaminii; he came to the Ajaces, [Note] and near them, Idomeneus on the other side amidst the Cretans, [Note]
Il. iii. 230.
not Menestheus. The Athenians then seem to have alleged

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some such evidence as this from Homer as a pretext, and the Megarians to have replied in an opposite strain of this kind; Ajax conducted ships from Salamis, from Polichna, from ægirussa, from Nisæa, and from Tripodes, [Note] which are places in Megaris, of which Tripodes has the name of Tripodiscium, situated near the present forum of Megara. 9.1.11

Some say, that Salamis is unconnected with Attica, because the priestess of Minerva Polias, who may not eat the new cheese of Attica, but the produce only of a foreign land, yet uses the Salaminian cheese. But this is a mistake, for she uses that which is brought from other islands, that are confessedly near Attica, for the authors of this custom considered all produce as foreign which was brought over sea.

It seems as if anciently the present Salamis was a separate state, and that Megara was a part of Attica.

On the sea-coast, opposite to Salamis, the boundaries of Megara and Attica are two mountains called Cerata, or Horns. [Note] 9.1.12

Next is the city Eleusis, [Note] in which is the temple of the Eleusinian Ceres, and the Mystic Enclosure (Secos), [Note] which Ictinus built, [Note] capable of containing the crowd of a theatre. It was this person that built [Note] the Parthenon in the Acropolis, in honour of Minerva, when Pericles was the superintendent of the public works. The city is enumerated among the demi, or burghs.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 9.1.5 Str. 9.1.10 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 9.1.15

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