Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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3.4.9

A river [Note] flows near to it, which has its sources in the Pyrenees; its outlet forms a port for the Emporitæ, who are skilful workers in flax. Of the interior of their country some parts are fertile, others covered with spartum, a rush which flourishes in marshes, and is entirely useless: they call this the June Plain. There are some who inhabit the Pyrenean mountains as far as the Trophies of Pompey, on the route which leads from Italy into Ulterior Iberia, [Note] and particularly into Bætica. This road runs sometimes close to the sea, sometimes at a distance therefrom, particularly in the western parts. From the Trophies of Pompey it leads to Tarraco, [Note] through the June Plain, the Betteres, [Note] and the plain called in the Latin tongue [the plain] of Marathon, on account

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of the quantity of fennel growing there. From Tarraco [the road runs] towards the passage of the Ebro at the city of Dertossa; [Note] from thence having traversed the city of Saguntum, [Note] and Setabis, [Note] it follows a course more and more distant from the sea, till it approaches the Plain of Spartarium, which signifies the Plain of Rushes. This is a vast arid plain, producing the species of rush from which cords are made, and which are exported to all parts, but particularly to Italy. [Note] Formerly the road passed on through the midst of the plain, and [the city of] Egelastæ, [Note] which was both difficult and long, but they have now constructed a new road close to the sea, which merely touches upon the Plain of Rushes, and leads to the same places as the former, [viz.] Castlon, [Note] and Obulco, [Note] through which runs the road to Corduba and Gades, [Note] the two greatest emporia [of Iberia]. Obulco is distant about 300 stadia from Corduba. Historians report that Cæsar came from Rome to Obulco, and to his army there, within the space of twenty-seven days, when about to fight the battle of Munda. [Note] 3.4.10

Such is the whole sea-coast from the Pillars to the confines of the Iberians and Kelts. The interior of the country lying above, and included between the mountains of the Pyrenees and the northern side [of Iberia], as far as the Astures, is principally divided by two mountain chains; the one of these is parallel to the Pyrenees, and takes its commencement from the country of the Cantabri, terminating at the Mediterranean. This is called the Idubeda. [Note] The second, springing from the middle [of this first], runs towards the west, inclining however to the south and the sea-coast towards the Pillars. At the commencement it consists of bare hills, but after traversing the Plain of Spartarium, falls in with the forest lying above Carthage, [Note] and the regions round Malaca. [Note] It is named Orospeda. [Note] The river Ebro flows between the Pyrenees and Idubeda, and parallel to both these mountains. It is fed by the rivers and other waters carried down

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from [the mountains]. Situated on the Ebro is the city of Cæsar Augusta, [Note] and the colony of Celsa, [Note] where there is a stone bridge across the river. This country is inhabited by many nations, the best known being that of the Jaccetani. [Note] Commencing at the foot of the Pyrenees, it widens out into the plains, and reaches to the districts around Ilerda [Note] and Osca, [Note] [cities] of the Ilergetes not far distant from the Ebro. It was in these cities, and in Calaguris, [Note] a city of the Gascons, as well as those of Tarraco [Note] and Hemeroscopium, [Note] situated on the coast, that Sertorius sustained the last efforts of the war, after being ejected from the country of the Keltiberians. He died at Osca, and it was near to Ilerda that Afranius and Petreius, Pompey's generals, were afterwards defeated by divus [Note] Cæsar. Ilerda is distant 160 stadia from the Ebro, which is on its west, about 460 from Tarraco, which is on the south, and 540 from Osca, which lies to the north. [Note] Passing through these places from Tarraco to the extremities of the Vascons who dwell by the ocean, near Pompelon [Note] and the city of Œaso [Note] situated on the ocean, the route extends 2400 stadia, to the very frontiers of Aquitaine and Iberia. It was in the country of the Jaccetani that Sertorius fought against Pompey, and here afterwards Sextus, Pompey's son, fought against the generals of Cæsar. The nation of the Vascons, in which is Pompelon, or Pompey's city, lies north of Jaccetania. 3.4.11

The side of the Pyrenees next Iberia is covered with forests containing numerous kinds of trees and evergreens, whilst the side next Keltica is bare: in the midst [the mountains] enclose valleys admirably fitted for the habitation of

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man. These are mainly possessed by the Kerretani, a people of the Iberians. The hams they cure are excellent, fully equal to those of the Cantabrians, [Note] and they realize no inconsiderable profit to the inhabitants.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 3.4.7 Str. 3.4.10 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 3.4.13

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