Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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11.8.7

Those who live in the islands have no corn-fields. Their food consists of roots and wild fruits. Their clothes are made of the bark of trees, for they have no sheep. They press out and drink the juice of the fruit of certain trees.

The inhabitants of the marshes eat fish. They are clothed in the skins of seals, which come upon the island from the sea.

The mountaineers subsist on wild fruits. They have besides a few sheep, but they kill them sparingly, and keep them for the sake of their wool and milk. Their clothes they variegate by steeping them in dyes, which produce a colour not easily effaced.

The inhabitants of the plains, although they possess land, do not cultivate it, but derive their subsistence from their flocks, and from fish, after the manner of the nomades and Scythians. I have frequently described a certain way of life common to all these people. Their burial-places and their manners are alike, and their whole manner of living is independent, but rude, savage, and hostile; in their compacts, however, they are simple and without deceit. 11.8.8

The Attasii (Augasii?) and the Chorasmii belong to the Massagetæ and Sacæ, to whom Spitamenes directed his flight from Bactria and Sogdiana. He was one of the Persians who, like Bessus, made his escape from Alexander by flight, as Arsaces afterwards fled from Seleucus Callinicus, and retreated among the Aspasiacæ.

Eratosthenes says, that the Bactrians lie along the Arachoti and Massagetæ on the west near the Oxus, and that Sacæ and Sogdiani, through the whole extent of their territory, [Note] are opposite to India, but the Bactrii in part only, for the greater part of their country lies parallel to the Parapomisus; that the Sacæ and Sogdiani are separated by the Iaxartes, and the Sogdiani and Bactriani by the Oxus; that Tapyri occupy the country between Hyrcani and Arii; that around the shores of the sea, next to the Hyrcani, are Amardi, Anariacæ, Cadusii, Albani, Caspii, Vitii, and perhaps other tribes extending as far as the Scythians; that on the other side of the

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Hyrcani are Derbices, that the Caducii are contiguous both to the Medes and Matiani below the Parachoathras. 11.8.9

These are the distances which he gives.
Stadia.
From the Caspian Sea to the Cyrus about1800
Thence to the Caspian Gates5600
Thence to Alexandreia in the territory of the Arii6400
Thence to the city Bactra, which is called also Zariaspa3870
Thence to the river Iaxartes, which Alexander reached, about5000
———
Making a total of22,670
———

He also assigns the following distances from the Caspian Gates to India.
Stadia.
To Hecatompylos [Note]1960
To Alexandreia [Note] in the country of the Arii (Ariana)4530
Thence to Prophthasia [Note] in Dranga [Note] (or according to others 1500)1600
Thence to the city Arachoti [Note]4120
Thence to Ortospana on the three roads from Bactra [Note]2000
Thence to the confines of India1000
———
Which together amount to15,300 [Note]
———

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We must regard as continuous with this distance, in a straight line, the length of India, reckoned from the Indus to the, Eastern Sea.

Thus much then respecting the Sacæ.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 11.8.5 Str. 11.8.9 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 11.9.2

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