Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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10.1.4

It is situated below Mount Telethrius, at a place called Drymus, near the river Callas, on a lofty rock; [Note] whence perhaps because the Ellopians, the former inhabitants, were a mountain tribe, [Note] the city had the name of Oreus. Orion, who was brought up there, seems to have had his name from the place. But according to some writers, the Oreitæ, who had a

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city of their own, being attacked by the Ellopians, migrated, and settled with the Histiæans, and although it was a single city it had both appellations, as Lacedæmon and Sparta were the same city. We have said, that the Histiæotis in Thessaly had its name from the people who were carried away from this country by the Perrhæbi. 10.1.5

As Ellopia induced us to commence our description with Histiæa and Oreus, we shall proceed with the places continuous with these.

The promontory Cenæum is near Oreus, and on the promontory is situated Dium, [Note] and Athenæ Diades, a town founded by Athenians, and overlooks the passage across the strait to Cynus. Canæ in æolia received colonists from Dium. These places are situated near Histiea, and besides these Cerinthus, a small city, close to the sea. Near it is a river Budorus, of the same name as the mountain in Salamis on the side of Attica, 10.1.6

Carystus [Note] lies at the foot of the mountain Oche, and near it are Styra [Note] and Marmarium, [Note] where is a quarry, from which are obtained the Carystian columns. It has a temple of Apollo Marmarinus, where there is a passage across to Hale-Araphenides. At Carystus there is found in the earth a stone, [Note] which is combed like wool, and woven, so that napkins are made of this substance, which, when soiled, are thrown into the fire, and cleaned, as in the washing of linen. [Note] These places are said to be inhabited by colonists from the Tetrapolis of Marathon, and by Steirieis. Styra was destroyed in the Maliac (Lamiac?) war by Phædrus, the general of the Athenians. But the Eretrians are in possession of the territory. There is also a Carystus in Laconia, a place belonging to ægys, towards Arcadia; from whence comes the Carystian wine, spoken of by Alcman. 10.1.7

Geræstus [Note] is not mentioned by Homer in the Catalogue of the Ships; it is however mentioned by him elsewhere;

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The vessels came to Geræstus by night; [Note]
Od. iii. 177.
which shows, that the place being near Sunium lies conveniently for persons who cross from Asia to Attica. It has a temple of Neptune the most remarkable of any in that quarter, and a considerable number of inhabitants. 10.1.8

Next to Geræstus is Eretria, which, after Chalcis, is the largest city in Eubœa. Next follows Chalcis, the capital as it were of the island, situated immediately on the Euripus. Both these cities are said to have been founded by Athenians before the Trojan war; [but it is also said that] after the Trojan war, æclus and Cothus took their departure from Athens; the former to found Eretria, and Cothus, Chalcis. A body of æolians who belonged to the expedition of Penthilus remained in the island. Anciently, even Arabians [Note] settled there, who came over with Cadmus.

These cities, Eretria and Chalcis, when their population was greatly augmented, sent out considerable colonies to Macedonia, for Eretria founded cities about Pallene and Mount Athos; Chalcis founded some near Olynthus, which Philip destroyed. There are also many settlements in Italy and Sicily, founded by Chalcidians. These colonies were sent out, according to Aristotle, [Note] when the government of the Hippobatæ, (or Knights,) as it is called, was established; it was an aristocratical government, the heads of which held their office by virtue of the amount of their property. At the time that Alexander passed over into Asia, they enlarged the compass of the walls of their city, including within them Canethus, [Note] and the Euripus, and erected towers upon the bridge, a wall, and gates. 10.1.9

Above the city of the Chalcidians is the plain called Lelantum, in which are hot springs, adapted to the cure of diseases, and which were used by Cornelius Sylla, the Roman general. There was also an extraordinary mine which produced both copper and iron; such, writers say, is not to be found elsewhere. At present, however, both are exhausted.

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The whole of Eubœa is subject to earthquakes, especially the part near the strait. It is also exposed to violent subterraneous blasts, like Bœotia, and other places of which I have before spoken at length. [Note] The city of the same name as the island is said to have been swallowed up by an earthquake. [Note] It is mentioned by æschylus in his tragedy of Glaucus Pontius; Euboïs near the bending shore of Jupiter Cenæus, close to the tomb of the wretched Lichas.

There is also in ætolia a town of the name of Chalcis, Chalcis on the sea-coast, and the rocky Calydon, [Note]
Il. ii. 640.
and another in the present Eleian territory; they passed along Cruni, and the rocky Chalcis, [Note]
Od. xv. 295.
speaking of Telemachus and his companions, when they left Nestor to return to their own country.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 10.1.1 Str. 10.1.7 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 10.1.14

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