Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
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10.1.3

The island had the name not of Macris only, but of Abantis also. The poet in speaking of Eubœa never calls the inhabitants from the name of the island, Eubœans, but always Abantes; they who possessed Eubœa, the resolute Abantes; [Note]
in his train Abantes were following.
Aristotle says that Thracians, taking their departure from Aba, the Phocian city, settled with the other inhabitants in the island, and gave the name of Abantes to those who already occupied it; other writers say that they had their name from a hero, [Note] as that of Eubœa was derived from a heroine. [Note] But perhaps as a certain cave on the sea-coast fronting the

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ægean Sea is called Boos-Aule, (or the Cow's Stall.) where lo is said to have brought forth Epaphus, so the island may have had the name Eubœa [Note] on this account.

It was also called Oché, which is the name of one of the largest mountains [Note] there.

It had the name of Ellopia, from Ellops, the son of Ion; according to others, he was the brother of æclus, and Cothus, who is said to have founded Ellopia, [Note] a small place situated in the district called Oria of the Histiæotis, near the mountain Telethrius. [Note] He also possessed Histiæa, Perias, Cerinthus, ædepsus, [Note] and Orobie, where was an oracle very free from deception. There also was an oracle of Apollo Selinuntius.

The Ellopians, after the battle of Leuctra, were compelled by the tyrant Philistides to remove to the city Histiea, and augmented the number of its inhabitants. Demosthenes [Note] says that Philistides was appointed by Philip tyrant of the Oreitæ also, for afterwards the Histiæans had that name, and the city, instead of Histiæa, was called Oreus. According to some writers, Histiæa was colonized by Athenians from the demus of the Histiæeis, as Eretria was from the demus of the Eretrieis. But Theopompus says, that when Pericles had reduced Eubœa, the Histiæans agreed to remove into Macedonia, and that two thousand Athenians, who formerly composed the demus of the Histiæans, came, and founded Oreus. [Note] 10.1.4

It is situated below Mount Telethrius, at a place called Drymus, near the river Callas, on a lofty rock; [Note] whence perhaps because the Ellopians, the former inhabitants, were a mountain tribe, [Note] the city had the name of Oreus. Orion, who was brought up there, seems to have had his name from the place. But according to some writers, the Oreitæ, who had a

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city of their own, being attacked by the Ellopians, migrated, and settled with the Histiæans, and although it was a single city it had both appellations, as Lacedæmon and Sparta were the same city. We have said, that the Histiæotis in Thessaly had its name from the people who were carried away from this country by the Perrhæbi. 10.1.5

As Ellopia induced us to commence our description with Histiæa and Oreus, we shall proceed with the places continuous with these.

The promontory Cenæum is near Oreus, and on the promontory is situated Dium, [Note] and Athenæ Diades, a town founded by Athenians, and overlooks the passage across the strait to Cynus. Canæ in æolia received colonists from Dium. These places are situated near Histiea, and besides these Cerinthus, a small city, close to the sea. Near it is a river Budorus, of the same name as the mountain in Salamis on the side of Attica, 10.1.6

Carystus [Note] lies at the foot of the mountain Oche, and near it are Styra [Note] and Marmarium, [Note] where is a quarry, from which are obtained the Carystian columns. It has a temple of Apollo Marmarinus, where there is a passage across to Hale-Araphenides. At Carystus there is found in the earth a stone, [Note] which is combed like wool, and woven, so that napkins are made of this substance, which, when soiled, are thrown into the fire, and cleaned, as in the washing of linen. [Note] These places are said to be inhabited by colonists from the Tetrapolis of Marathon, and by Steirieis. Styra was destroyed in the Maliac (Lamiac?) war by Phædrus, the general of the Athenians. But the Eretrians are in possession of the territory. There is also a Carystus in Laconia, a place belonging to ægys, towards Arcadia; from whence comes the Carystian wine, spoken of by Alcman. 10.1.7

Geræstus [Note] is not mentioned by Homer in the Catalogue of the Ships; it is however mentioned by him elsewhere;

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The vessels came to Geræstus by night; [Note]
Od. iii. 177.
which shows, that the place being near Sunium lies conveniently for persons who cross from Asia to Attica. It has a temple of Neptune the most remarkable of any in that quarter, and a considerable number of inhabitants.



Strabo, Geography (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Str.].
<<Str. 10.1.1 Str. 10.1.6 (Greek English(2)) >>Str. 10.1.10

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