Diodorus Siculus, Library (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Diod. Sic.].
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ch. 3 17.3.1Alexander knew that many of the Greeks were anxious to revolt, and was seriously worried. 17.3.2In Athens, where Demosthenes kept agitating against Macedon, the news of Philip's death was received with rejoicing, and the Athenians were not ready to concede the leading position among the Greeks to Macedon. They communicated secretly with Attalus and arranged to co-operate with him, and they encouraged many of the cities to strike for their freedom.

17.3.3The Aetolians voted to restore those of the Acarnanians who had experienced exile because of Philip. The Ambraciots were persuaded by one Aristarchus to expel the garrison placed in their city by Philip and to transform their government into a democracy. 17.3.4Similarly, the Thebans voted to drive out the garrison in the Cadmeia and not to concede to Alexander the leadership of the Greeks. The Arcadians alone of the Greeks had never acknowledged Philip's leadership nor did they now recognize that of Alexander. 17.3.5Otherwise in the Peloponnesus the Argives and Eleians and Lacedaemonians, with others, moved to recover their independence. [Note] Beyond the frontiers of Macedonia, many tribes moved toward revolt and a general feeling of unrest swept through the natives in that quarter. [Note]

17.3.6But, for all the problems and fears that beset his kingdom on every side, Alexander, who had only just reached manhood, brought everything into order impressively and swiftly. Some he won by persuasion and diplomacy, others he frightened into keeping the peace, [Note] but some had to be mastered by force and so reduced to submission.



Diodorus Siculus, Library (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Diod. Sic.].
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