Aeschylus, Agamemnon (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Aesch. Ag.].
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1617
AIGISTHOS. Thou such things soundest -- seated at the lower
Oarage to those who rule at the ship's mid-bench?
Thou shalt know, being old, how heavy is teaching
To one of the like age -- bidden be modest!
But chains and old age and the pangs of fasting
Stand out before all else in teaching, -- prophets
At souls'-cure! Dost not, seeing aught, see this too?
Against goads kick not, lest tript-up thou suffer!
CHOROS. Woman, thou, -- of him coming new from battle
Houseguard -- thy husband's bed the while disgracing, --
For the Army-leader didst thou plan this fate too?
AIGISTHOS. These words too are of groans the prime-begetters!
Truly a tongue opposed to Orpheus hast thou:
Foi he led all things by his voice's grace-charm,
But thou, upstirring them by these wild yelpings,
Wilt lead them! Forced, thou wilt appear the tamer!
CHOROS. So -- thou shalt be my king then of the Argeians --
Who, not when for this man his fate thou plannedst,
Daredst to do this deed -- thyself the slayer!
AIGISTHOS. For, to deceive him was the wife's part, certes:
I was looked after -- foe, ay, old-begotten!
But out of this man's wealth will I endeavour
To rule the citizens: and the no-man-minder
-- Him will I heavily yoke -- by no means trace-horse,
A corned-up colt! but that bad friend in darkness,
Famine its housemate, shall behold him gentle.
CHOROS. Why then, this man here, from a coward spirit,
Didst not thou slay thyself? But, -- helped, -- a woman,
The country's pest, and that of gods o' the country,
Killed him! Orestes, where may he see light now?
That coming hither back, with gracious fortune,
Of both these he may be the all-conquering slayer?


Aeschylus, Agamemnon (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Aesch. Ag.].
<<Aesch. Ag. 1577 Aesch. Ag. 1617 (GreekEnglish) >>Aesch. Ag. 1649

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