Aeschylus, Agamemnon (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Aesch. Ag.].
<<Aesch. Ag. 1295 Aesch. Ag. 1331 (GreekEnglish) >>Aesch. Ag. 1343

1331
CHOROS. Alas for mortal matters! Happy-fortuned, --
Why, any shade would turn them: if unhappy,
By throws the wetting sponge has spoiled the picture!
And more by much in mortals this I pity.
The being well-to-do --
Insatiate a desire of this
Born with all mortals is,
Nor any is there who
Well-being forces off, aroints
From roofs whereat a finger points,
"No more come in!" exclaiming. This man, too,
To take the city of Priamos did the celestials give,
And, honoured by the god, he homeward comes;
But now if, of the former, he shall pay
The blood back, and, for those who ceased to live,
Dying, for deaths in turn new punishment he dooms--
Who, being mortal, would not pray
With an unmischievous
Daimon to have been born -- who would not, hearing thus?


Aeschylus, Agamemnon (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Aesch. Ag.].
<<Aesch. Ag. 1295 Aesch. Ag. 1331 (GreekEnglish) >>Aesch. Ag. 1343

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