Herodotus, The Histories (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Hdt.].
<<Hdt. 8.78 Hdt. 8.79 (Greek) >>Hdt. 8.80

ch. 79 8.79.1 As the generals disputed, Aristides son of Lysimachus, an Athenian, crossed over from Aegina. Although he had been ostracized by the people, I, learning by inquiry of his character, have come to believe that he was the best and most just man in Athens. 8.79.2 This man stood at the assembly and called Themistocles out, although he was no friend of his, but his bitter enemy. Because of the magnitude of the present ills, he deliberately forgot all that and called him out, wanting to talk to him. He had already heard that those from the Peloponnese were anxious to set sail for the Isthmus, 8.79.3 so when Themistocles came out he said, “On all occasions and especially now our contention must be over which of us will do our country more good. 8.79.4 I say that it is all the same for the Peloponnesians to speak much or little about sailing away from here, for I have seen with my own eyes that even if the Corinthians and Eurybiades himself wanted to, they would not be able to escape. We are encircled by the enemy. Go in and indicate this to them.”



Herodotus, The Histories (English) (XML Header) [word count] [Hdt.].
<<Hdt. 8.78 Hdt. 8.79 (Greek) >>Hdt. 8.80

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