Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1461a.1 Arist. Poet. 1461a.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1461b.1

1461a.20"All" is used instead of "many" metaphorically, "all" being a species of "many." [Note] And again, "Alone unsharing " [Note] is metaphorical; the best known is called the only one.

By intonation also; for example, the solutions of Hippias of Thasos, his " δίδομεν δέ οἱ" [Note] and τὸ μὲν οὗ καταπύθεται ὄμβρῳ [Note]; and by punctuation; for example, the lines of Empedocles: Soon mortal grow they that aforetime learnt Immortal ways, and pure erstwhile commingled. [Note] Or again by ambiguity, e.g. παρῴχηκεν δὲ πλέω νύξ, where πλείω is ambiguous. [Note] Others according to the habitual use of the phrase, e.g. wine and water is called "wine" so you get the phrase "greaves of new-wrought tin"; [Note] or workers in iron are called "braziers," and so Ganymede is said to pour wine for Zeus, though they do not drink wine. This last might however be metaphorical. [Note]

Whenever a word seems to involve a contradiction, one should consider how many different meanings it might bear in the passage, e.g. in "There the bronzen shaft was stayed," [Note] we should ask in how many ways "being stayed" might be taken, interpreting the passage in this sense or in that, and keeping as far as possible from the attitude which Glaucon [Note] describes



Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1461a.1 Arist. Poet. 1461a.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1461b.1

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