Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1458b.1 Arist. Poet. 1458b.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1459a.1

1458b.20For instance, Aeschylus and Euripides wrote the same iambic line with the change of one word only, a rare word in place of one made ordinary by custom, yet the one line seems beautiful and the other trivial. Aeschylus in the Philoctetes wrote, "The ulcer eats the flesh of this my foot," and Euripides instead of "eats" put "feasts upon." Or take "I that am small, of no account nor goodly;" suppose one were to read the line substituting the ordinary words, "I that am little and weak and ugly." Or compare "He set a stool unseemly and a table small." with "He set a shabby stool and a little table," or "the sea-shore is roaring" with "the sea-shore is shrieking." [Note]

Ariphrades [Note] again made fun of the tragedians because they employ phrases which no one would use in conversation, like " δωμάτων ἄπο" instead of ἀπὸ δωμάτων and their " σέθεν"and " ἐγὼ δέ νιν"and " Ἀχιλλέως πέρι" for περὶ Ἀχιλλέως, and so on.



Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1458b.1 Arist. Poet. 1458b.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1459a.1

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