Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1456a.1 Arist. Poet. 1456a.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1456b.1

1456a.20they admirably achieve their end, which is a tragic effect that also satisfies your feelings. This is achieved when the wise man, who is, however, unscrupulous, is deceived—like Sisyphus—and the man who is brave but wicked is worsted. And this, as Agathon says, is a likely result, since it is likely that many quite unlikely things should happen.

The chorus too must be regarded as one of the actors. It must be part of the whole and share in the action, not as in Euripides but as in Sophocles. In the others the choral odes have no more to do with the plot than with any other tragedy. And so they sing interludes, a practice begun by Agathon. And yet to sing interludes is quite as bad as transferring a whole speech or scene from one play to another.

The other factors have been already discussed. It remains to speak of "Diction" and "Thought." All that concerns Thought may be left to the treatise on Rhetoric, for the subject is more proper to that inquiry. [Note] Under the head of Thought come all the effects to be produced by the language. Some of these are proof and refutation,



Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1456a.1 Arist. Poet. 1456a.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1456b.1

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