Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
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1455a.20 In the second place come those that are the result of inference.

In constructing plots and completing the effect by the help of dialogue the poet should, as far as possible, keep the scene before his eyes. Only thus by getting the picture as clear as if he were present at the actual event, will he find what is fitting and detect contradictions. The censure upon Carcinos is evidence of this. Amphiaraos was was made to rise from a temple. The poet did not visualize the scene and therefore this escaped his notice, but on the stage it was a failure since the audience objected. [Note] The poet should also, as far as possible, complete the effect by using the gestures. For, if their natural powers are equal, those who are actually in the emotions are the most convincing; he who is agitated blusters and the angry man rages with the maximum of conviction. [Note] And that is why poetry needs either a sympathetic nature or a madman, [Note] the former being impressionable and the latter inspired.

The stories, whether they are traditional or whether you make them up yourself,



Aristotle, Poetics (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose] [word count] [Arist. Poet.].
<<Arist. Poet. 1455a.1 Arist. Poet. 1455a.20 (Greek) >>Arist. Poet. 1455b.1

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