Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (English) (XML Header) [genre: poetry; drama; tragedy] [word count] [Aesch. Cho.].
<<Aesch. Cho. 831 Aesch. Cho. 838 (Greek) >>Aesch. Cho. 855

838

Enter Aegisthus

Aegisthus I have come not unasked but summoned by a messenger. I heard startling news told by some strangers who have arrived, tidings far from welcome: 840—that Orestes is dead. To lay this too upon our house would be a fearful burden when it is still festering and galled by the wound inflicted by an earlier murder. How can I believe this tale is the living truth? Or is it merely a panic-stricken report spread by women 845which leaps up to die away in nothingness? What can you tell me of this to make it plain to my mind?

Chorus We heard the tale, it is true. But go inside and inquire of the strangers. The certainty of a messenger's report is nothing compared with one's own interrogation of the man himself. 850

Aegisthus I wish to see the messenger and put him to the test again—whether he himself was present at the death or merely repeats from vague reports what he has heard. No! Be sure he cannot deceive a mind with eyes open.Exit



Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (English) (XML Header) [genre: poetry; drama; tragedy] [word count] [Aesch. Cho.].
<<Aesch. Cho. 831 Aesch. Cho. 838 (Greek) >>Aesch. Cho. 855

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