Aeschylus, Agamemnon (English) (XML Header) [genre: poetry; drama; tragedy] [word count] [Aesch. Ag.].
<<Aesch. Ag. 248 Aesch. Ag. 258 (Greek English(2)) >>Aesch. Ag. 281

258

Chorus I have come, Clytaemestra, in obedience to your royal authority; for it is fitting to do homage to the consort of a sovereign prince 260when her husband's throne is empty. Now whether the news you have heard is good or ill, and you do make sacrifice with hopes that herald gladness, I wish to hear; yet, if you would keep silence, I make no complaint.

Clytaemestra As herald of gladness, with the proverb, 265may Dawn be born from her mother Night! You shall hear joyful news surpassing all your hopes—the Argives have taken Priam's town!

Chorus What have you said? The meaning of your words has escaped me, so incredible they seemed.

Clytaemestra I said that Troy is in the hands of the Achaeans. Is my meaning clear?

Chorus 270Joy steals over me, and it challenges my tears.

Clytaemestra Sure enough, for your eye betrays your loyal heart.

Chorus What then is the proof? Have you evidence of this?

Clytaemestra I have, indeed; unless some god has played me false.

Chorus Do you believe the persuasive visions of dreams?

Clytaemestra 275I would not heed the fancies of a slumbering brain.

Chorus But can it be some pleasing rumor that has fed your hopes?

Clytaemestra Truly you scorn my understanding as if it were a child's.

Chorus But at what time was the city destroyed?

Clytaemestra In the night, I say, that has but now given birth to this day here.

Chorus 280And what messenger could reach here with such speed?



Aeschylus, Agamemnon (English) (XML Header) [genre: poetry; drama; tragedy] [word count] [Aesch. Ag.].
<<Aesch. Ag. 248 Aesch. Ag. 258 (Greek English(2)) >>Aesch. Ag. 281

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