Demosthenes, Speeches (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose; rhetoric] [word count] [Dem.].
<<Dem. 47.55 Dem. 47.65 (Greek) >>Dem. 47.75

47.62When, then, the news of what had been done was brought me in Peiraeus by the neighhors, I went to the farm, but found that these men had left; I saw, however, that the household goods had been carried off and in what plight the old woman was. My wife told me what had taken place, so, early next morning, I approached Theophemus in the city, having witnesses with me, and demanded, first that he accept payment of the amount of his judgement, and go with me to the bank, then, that he should provide for the care of the old woman whom they had beaten, calling in any physician whom they pleased. 47.63While I was saying this and solemnly protesting against their actions, they abused me roundly; then Theophemus went with me very reluctantly and making much delay, alleging that he too wished to take witnesses along with him (this talk was a trick on his part to gain time); but this fellow Evergus went at once from the city in company with some others of like stamp to the farm. The furniture which I had remaining—some few pieces which the day before happened to be in the tower and not outside—had, after I came home, necessarily been brought down, and Evergus, forcing open the gate which they had broken down the day before, and which was scarcely fastened, carried off my furniture—Evergus, to whom I owed no judgement, and with whom I had had no business transaction whatever. 47.64On my making full payment to Theophemus to whom I owed the judgement, when I had paid him in the presence of many witnesses eleven hundred drachmae, the amount of the judgement, one hundred and eighty-three drachmae two obols for the fine of one-sixth of that sum, and thirty drachmae for court fees (I owed him nothing in the way of other penalties)—when, I say, he had received from me at the bank one thousand three hundred and thirteen drachmae two obols, the total amount, on my demanding the return of the sheep and the slaves and the furniture of which he had robbed me, he declared that he would not return them to me unless I should release him and his associates from all claims, and the witnesses from the suit for false testimony. 47.65When he had given me this reply, I called upon those present to be witnesses to his answer, but I paid him the judgement, for I did not think it best to he in default. As for Evergus, I did not know that he had gone to my house on that day, but as soon as the judgement had been paid, while Theophemus still had the sheep and the slaves and the furniture, a stone-cutter, who was working on the monument near by, came to bring me word that Evergus had carried off from the house the rest of my furniture—that, namely, which had remained untouched the day before,—Evergus, with whom I had nothing whatever to do.

47.66To prove that I am speaking the truth, that on the day before they had taken from me goods as security, and that the next day they recovered the money from me (and yet, if the money had not been got together and I had not given them notice, how, pray, could they have secured immediate payment?), and that on that very day they had gone again into the house, while I was paying the money—to prove all this, the clerk shall read you the depositions.Depositions

47.67Since, then, men of the jury, he paid no heed, when I served notice on him to care for the woman whom they had beaten and to bring in a physician, I myself brought in one with whom I had had dealings for many years, and he cared for her during her illness. I showed him the plight she was in, and brought witnesses. Hearing from the physician that the woman's condition was hopeless, I again took other witnesses, and pointing out the condition she was in served notice on these men to care for her. On the sixth day after these men had come into the house the nurse died.

To prove that I am speaking the truth in this, the clerk shall read you the depositions bearing upon these matters.Depositions

47.68Well then, after her death I went to the Interpreters [Note] in order to learn what I ought to do in the matter, and I related to them all that had taken place: the coming of these men, the devotion of the woman, why it was that I kept her in my house, and that she had met her end because she would not surrender the cup. When the Interpreters had heard all this from me, they asked me whether they should interpret the law for me and nothing more, or should also advise me. 47.69On my answering them, “Both,” they said to me, “Very well, we will interpret for you the law, and also give you advice to your profit. In the first place, if there be anyone related to the woman, let him carry a spear when she is borne forth to the tomb and make solemn proclamation at the tomb, and thereafter let him guard the tomb for the space of three days. And this is the advice which we give you: since you were not yourself present, but only your wife and your children, and since you have no other witnesses, we advise you not to make proclamation against anyone by name, but in general against the perpetrators and the murderers; 47.70and again not to institute suit before the king. [Note] For that course is not open to you under the law, since the woman is not a relative of yours nor yet a servant, according to your own statement; and it is to relatives or to masters that the law appoints the duty of prosecuting. If, then, you should take the oath at the Palladium, [Note] yourself and your wife and your children, and imprecate curses upon yourselves and your house, you will lose the goodwill of many, and if your opponent is acquitted, you will be thought to have committed perjury, and if you convict him, you will he an object of malice. No, after you have performed the proper religious rites to cleanse yourself and your house, bear your misfortune with such patience as you can, and, if you choose, avenge yourself in some other way.”



Demosthenes, Speeches (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose; rhetoric] [word count] [Dem.].
<<Dem. 47.55 Dem. 47.65 (Greek) >>Dem. 47.75

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