Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].

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Appendix: List of Verbs

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THIS List in general includes the common verbs showing any formal peculiarity of tense. The forms printed in heavy-faced type belong to standard Attic, that is, to the language used in common speech and in ordinary prose; others are poetical, doubtful, dialectal or late. Many regular forms are omitted because they do not appear in the classical writers; though their non-appearance in the extant texts may often be accidental. Later forms are usually excluded, but reference is made to Aristotle, and to Hippocrates, though many works ascribed to him are of later date. The determination of the forms of Attic prose as distinguished from those of poetry is often difficult because of insufficient evidence, and in many cases certainty is not to be attained. The tenses employed in the dialogue parts of Aristophanes and other early writers of Attic comedy are usually to be regarded as existing in the spoken language except when the character of the verb in question is such as to indicate borrowing from Epic or tragedy. Sometimes a tense attested only in tragedy and in Attic prose of the latter part of the fourth century may have been used in the best Attic prose. The expression in prose means in Attic prose.

A prefixed hyphen indicates that a form used in prose is attested generally, or only, in composition; and that a poetical form occurs only in composition. Rigid consistency would have led to too great detail; besides, many tenses cited as existing only in composition may have occurred also in the simple form. For the details of usage on this and other points the student is referred to Veitch, Greek Verbs, Irregular and Defective, and to Kühner-Blass, Griechische Grammatik.

The tenses cited are those of the principal parts ( cross369). Tenses inferred from these are omitted, but mention is made of the future perfect, future passive, and of the future middle when it shows a passive sense.

An assumed form is marked by * or has no accent; the abbreviations aor. and perf. denote first aorist and first perfect; of alternative forms in ττ or σς ( cross78), that in ττ is given when the verb in question belongs to the classical spoken language. In the citation of Epic forms, futures and aorists with σς, and several other Epic peculiarities, are usually not mentioned.

The appended Roman numerals indicate the class ( cross497- cross529) to which the present system of each verb belongs; all verbs not so designated belong to the first class ( cross498- cross504).

At the end of an item, "LSJ" marks a link to the verb's definition in the Greek-English Lexicon.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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