Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1570

An attributive word is usually necessary (but not in Hom.); otherwise the addition of the substantive to the verb would be tautologous. But the attribute is omitted:

a. When the nominal idea is specialized: φυλακὰ_ς φυλάττειν to stand sentry X. A. 2.6.10, φόρον φέρειν to pay tribute 5. 5. 7.

b. When the substantive is restricted by the article: τὸν πόλεμον πολεμεῖν to wage the present war T. 8.58, τὴν πομπὴν πέμπειν to conduct the procession 6. 56.

c. When a plural substantive denotes repeated occurrences: ἐτριηράρχησε τριηραρχία_ς he performed the duty of trierarch D. 45.85.

d. In various expressions: Ὀλύμπια νι_κᾶν to win an Olympian victory T. 1.126, τὴν ναυμαχία_ν νι_κῆσαι to be victorious in the sea-fight L. 19.28, θύ_ειν τὰ εὐαγγέλια to offer a sacrifice in honour of good news X. H. 1.6.37.

e. In poetry the use of a substantive to denote a special form of the action of the verb is much extended: στάζειν αἷμα to drip (drops of) blood S. Ph. 783, Ἄρηπνεῖν to breathe war A. Ag. 375, πῦρ δεδορκώς looking (a look of) fire τ 446. This use is common, especially in Aristophanes, with verbs signifying the look of another than the speaker: βλέπειν νᾶπυ to look mustard Eq. 631, βλέπειν ἀπιστία_ν to look unbelief Com. fr. 1. 341 (No. cross309); cp. “looked his faith”: Holmes.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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