Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1555

Many verbs may take an accusative either of the external or of the internal object: τέμνειν ὕ_λην fell timber, τέμνειν τὰ_ς τρίχας cut off the hair, τέμνειν ὁδόν open a road, but σπονδὰ_ς or ὅρκια τέμνειν, with a specialized verbal idea, to make a treaty by slaying a victim (pass. ὅρκια ἐτμήθη), τέμνειν ὁδόν make one's way (poet.), τειχίζειν χωρίον fortify a place, but τειχίζειν τεῖχος build a wall. Cp. E. Supp. 1060: A. νι_κῶσα νί_κην τίνα; μαθεῖν χρῄζω σέθεν. B. πά_σα_ς γυναῖκας, κτλ. A. Victorious in what victory? This I would learn of thee. B. Over all women. Here the construction shifts from the internal to the external object.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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