Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1531

Dative of Place.—In poetry the dative without a preposition is used to denote place.

a. Where a person or thing is: στὰ_ς μέσῳ ἕρκεϊ taking his stand in the middle of the court Ω 306, γῇ ἔκειτο she lay on the ground S. O. T. 1266, ναίειν ὄρεσιν to dwell among the mountains O. T. 1451. Often of the parts of the body (Hom. θυ_μῷ, καρδίῃ, etc.). With persons (generally in the plural): ἀριπρεπὴς Τρώεσσιν conspicuous among the Trojans Z 477. τοῖσι δ' ἀνέστη A 68 may be rose up among them or a dative proper (for them).

b. Place whither (limit of motion): πεδίῳ πέσε fell on the ground E 82, κολεῷ ἄορ θέο put thy sword into its sheath κ 333.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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