Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1469DATIVE AS INDIRECT COMPLEMENT OF VERBS

Many verbs take the dative as the indirect object together with an accusative as the direct object. The indirect object is commonly introduced in English by to.

Κῦρος δίδωσιν αὐτῷ ἓξ μηνῶν μισθόν Cyrus gives him pay for six months X. A. 1.1.10, τῷ Ὑρκανίῳ ἵππον ἐδωρήσατο he presented a horse to the Hyrcanian X. C. 8.4.24, τὰ δὲ ἄλλα διανεῖμαι τοῖς στρατηγοῖς to distribute the rest to the generals X. A. 7.5.2, μι_κρὸν μεγάλῳ εἰκάσαι to compare a small thing to a great thing T. 4.36, πέμπων αὐτῷ ἄγγελον sending a messenger to him X. A. 1.3.8, ὑπισχνοῦμαί σοι δέκα τάλαντα I promise you ten talents 1. 7. 18, τοῦτο σοὶ δ' ἐφί_εμαι I lay this charge upon thee S. Aj. 116, παρῄνει τοῖς Ἀθηναίοις τοιάδε he advised the Athenians as follows T. 6.8, ἐμοὶ ἐπιτρέψαι ταύτην τὴν ἀρχήν to entrust this command to me X. A. 6.1.31. λέγειν ταῦτα τοῖς στρατιώταις to say this to the soldiers 1. 4. 11 (λέγειν πρός τινα lacks the personal touch of the dative, which indicates interest in the person addressed). A dependent clause often represents the accusative.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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