Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1391 THE ABLATIVAL GENITIVE WITH VERBS

The same verb may govern both a true genitive and an ablatival genitive. So ἄρχεσθαι to begin ( cross1348 a) and to start from, ἔχεσθαι to hold to ( cross1345) and to keep oneself from. In many cases it is difficult to decide whether the genitive in question was originally the true genitive or the ablatival genitive, or whether the two have been combined; e.g. in κυνέη ῥι_νοῦ ποιητή a cap made of hide K 262, κύπελλον ἐδέξατο ἧς ἀλόχοιο he received a goblet from his wife Ω 305. So with verbs to hear from, know of ( cross1364, cross1411), and verbs of emotion ( cross1405), the partitive idea, cause, and source are hard to distinguish. Other cases open to doubt are verbs of missing ( cross1352), being deceived ( cross1392), and the exclamatory genitive ( cross1407).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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