Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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FREE USES OF THE GENITIVE 1388

Many verbs ordinarily construed with the accusative are also followed by a genitive of a person, apparently dependent on the verb but in reality governed by an accusative, generally a neuter pronoun or a dependent clause. Thus, τάδ' αὐτοῦ ἅγαμαι I admire this in him X. Ages. 2.7, τοῦτο ἐπαινῶ Ἀ_γησιλά_ου I praise this in Agesilaus 8. 4, αὐτῶν ἓν ἐθαύμασα I was astonished at one thing in them P. A. 17a. Ἀθηναῖοι σφῶν ταῦτα οὐκ ἀποδέξονται the Athenians will not be satisfied with them in this T. 7.48, ὂ μέμφονται μάλιστα ἡμῶν which they most censure in us 1. 84, εἰ ἄγασαι τοῦ πατρὸς ὅσα πέπρα_χε if you admire in my father what he has done (the actions of my father) X. C. 3.1.15, διαθεώμενος αὐτῶν ὅσην χώρα_ν ἔχοιεν contemplating how large a country they possess X. A. 3.1.19, θαυμάζω τῶν στρατηγῶν ὅτι οὐ πειρῶνται ἡμῖν ἐκπορίζειν σι_τηρέσιον I wonder that the generals do not try to supply us with money for provisions 6. 2. 4, ἐνενόησε δὲ αὐτῶν καὶ ὡς ἐπηρώτων ἀλλήλους he took note also how they asked each other questions X. C. 5.2.18. So with θεωρεῖν observe, ὑπονοεῖν feel suspicious of, ἐνθυ_μεῖσθαι consider, etc.

1389

From such constructions arose the use of the genitive in actual dependence on the verb without an accusative word or clause: ἄγασαι αὐτοῦ you admire him X. M. 2.6.33, θαυμάζω τῶν ὑπὲρ τῆς ἰδία_ς δόξης ἀποθνῄσκειν ἐθελόντων I wonder at those who are willing to die in defence of their personal opinions I. 6.93. The use in 1389 recalls that with αἰσθάνεσθαι ( cross1367). On ἄγασθαι, θαυμάζειν with the genitive of cause, see cross1405.

1390

A form of the genitive of possession appears in poetry with verbal adjectives and passive participles to denote the personal origin of an action (cp. cross1298): κείνης διδακτά taught of her S. El. 344, ἐκδιδαχθεὶς τῶν κατ' οἶκον informed by those in the house S. Tr. 934, πληγεὶς θυγατρός struck by a daughter E. Or. 497. Cp. διόσδοτος given of God; and “beloved of the Lord.”

On the genitive absolute, see cross2070.

1391 THE ABLATIVAL GENITIVE WITH VERBS

The same verb may govern both a true genitive and an ablatival genitive. So ἄρχεσθαι to begin ( cross1348 a) and to start from, ἔχεσθαι to hold to ( cross1345) and to keep oneself from. In many cases it is difficult to decide whether the genitive in question was originally the true genitive or the ablatival genitive, or whether the two have been combined; e.g. in κυνέη ῥι_νοῦ ποιητή a cap made of hide K 262, κύπελλον ἐδέξατο ἧς ἀλόχοιο he received a goblet from his wife Ω 305. So with verbs to hear from, know of ( cross1364, cross1411), and verbs of emotion ( cross1405), the partitive idea, cause, and source are hard to distinguish. Other cases open to doubt are verbs of missing ( cross1352), being deceived ( cross1392), and the exclamatory genitive ( cross1407).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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