Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1384

Many verbs compounded with ἀπό, πρό, ὑπέρ, ἐπί, and κατά take the genitive when the compound may be resolved into the simple verb and the preposition without change in the sense: τοὺς συμμάχους ἀποτρέψαντες τῆς γνώμης dissuading the allies from their purpose And. 3.21, προαπεστάλησαν τῆς ἀποστάσεως they were despatched before the revolt T. 3.5, πολλοῖς ἡ γλῶττα προτρέχει τῆς διανοία_ς in many people the tongue outruns the thought I. 1.41, (οἱ πολέμιοι) ὑπερκάθηνται ἡμῶν the enemy are stationed above us X. A. 5.1.9, τῷ ἐπιβάντι πρώτῳ τοῦ τείχους to the first one setting foot on the wall T. 4.116. This use is most frequent when the prepositions are used in their proper signification. Many compounds of ὑπέρ take the accusative.

a. This use is especially common with κατά against or at: μή μου κατείπῃς don't speak against me P. Th. 149a, κατεψεύσατό μου he spoke falsely against me D. 18.9, ψευδῆ κατεγλώττιζέ μου he mouthed lies at me Ar. Ach. 380. The construction in 1384 is post-Homeric.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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