Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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931

The nominative subject of the third person may be omitted

a. When it is expressed or implied in the context: ὁ σὸς πατὴρ φοβεῖται μὴ τὰ ἔσχατα πάθῃ your father is afraid lest he suffer death X. C. 3.1.22.

b. When the subject is indefinite, especially when it is the same person or thing as the omitted subject of a preceding infinitive ( cross937 a): ἡ τοῦ οἴεσθαι εἰδένάι (ἀμαθία_), ἃ οὐκ οἶδεν the ignorance of thinking one knows what one does not know P. A. 29b. Often in legal language: ὁ νόμος, ὃς κελεύει τὰ ἑαυτοῦ ἐξεῖναι διαθέσθαι ὅπως ἂν ἐθέλῃ the law, which enjoins that a man has the right to dispose of his property as he wishes Is. 2.13.

c. When a particular person is meant, who is easily understood from the situation: τοὺς νόμους ἀναγνώσεται he (the clerk) will read the laws Aes. 3.15.

d. When it is a general idea of person, and usually in the third person plural of verbs of saying and thinking: ὡς λέγουσιν as they say D. 5.18. So φα_σί they say, οἴονται people think; cp. aiunt, ferunt, tradunt.

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e. In descriptions of locality: ἦν δὲ κρημνῶδες for it (the place) was steep T. 7.84.

f. In impersonal verbs ( cross932, cross934).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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