Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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GENITIVE OF PRICE AND VALUE 1372

The genitive is used with verbs signifying to buy, sell, cost, value, exchange. The price for which one gives or does anything stands in the genitive.

ἀργυρίου πρίασθαι ἢ ἀποδόσθαι ἵππον to buy or sell a horse for money P. R. 333b, Θεμιστοκλέα_ τῶν μεγίστων δωρεῶν ἠξίωσαν they deemed Themistocles worthy of the greatest gifts I. 4.154, οὐκ ἀνταλλακτέον μοι τὴν φιλοτι_μία_ν οὐδενὸς κέρδους I must not barter my public spirit for any price D. 19.223. So with τάττειν rate, μισθοῦν let, μισθοῦσθαι hire, ἐργάζεσθαι work, and with any verb of doing anything for a wage, as οἱ τῆς παρ' ἡμέρα_ν χάριτος τὰ μέγιστα τῆς πόλεως ἀπολωλεκότες those who have ruined the highest interests of the State to purchase ephemeral popularity D. 8.70, πόσου διδάσκει; πέντε μνῶν for how much does he teach? for five minae P. A. 20b, οἱ Χαλδαῖοι μισθοῦ στρατεύονται the Chaldaeans serve for pay X. C. 3.2.7.

a. The instrumental dative is also used. With verbs of exchanging, ἀντί is usual ( cross1683).

1373

To value highly and lightly is περὶ πολλοῦ (πλείονος, πλείστου) and περὶ ὀλίγου (ἐλά_ττονος, ἐλαχίστου) τι_μᾶσθαι or ποιεῖσθαι: τὰ πλείστου ἄξια περὶ ἐλαχίστου ποιεῖται, τὰ δὲ φαυλότερα περὶ πλείονος he makes least account of what is most important, and sets higher what is less estimable P. A. 30a. The genitive of value, without περί, is rare: πολλοῦ ποιοῦμαι ἀκηκοέναι ἃ ἀκήκοα Πρωταγόρου I esteem it greatly to have heard what I did from Protagoras P. Pr. 328d.

a. The genitive of cause is rarely used to express the thing bought or that for which pay is demanded: οὐδένα τῆς συνουσία_ς ἀργύριον πρά_ττει you charge nobody anything for your teaching X. M. 1.6.11, τρεῖς μναῖ διφρίσκου three minae for a small chariot Ar. Nub. 31.

1374

In legal language τι_μᾶν τινι θανάτου is to fix the penalty at death (said of the jury, which is not interested in the result), τι_μᾶσθαί τινι θανάτου to propose death as the penalty (said of the accuser, who is interested), and τιμᾶσθαί τινος to propose a penalty against oneself (said of the accused). Cp. τι_μᾶταί μοι ὁ ἀνὴρ θανάτου the man proposes death as my penalty P. A. 36b, ἀλλὰ δὴ φυγῆς τι_μήσωμαι; ἴσως γὰρ ἄν μοι τούτου τι_μήσαιτε but shall I propose exile as my penalty? for perhaps you (the jury) might fix it at this 37 c. So θανάτου with κρί_νειν, διώκειν, ὑπάγειν. Cp. cross1379.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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