Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1361

The genitive is used with verbs signifying to hear and perceive: ἀκούειν, κλύειν (poet.) hear, ἀκροᾶσθαι listen to, αἰσθάνεσθαι perceive, πυνθάνεσθαι hear, learn of, συνι_έναι understand, ὀσφραίνεσθαι scent. The person or thing, whose words, sound, etc. are perceived by the senses, stands in the genitive; the words, sound, etc. generally stand in the accusative.

τινὸς ἤκουσ' εἰπόντος I heard somebody say D. 8.4, ἀκούσαντες τῆς σάλπιγγος hearing the sound of the trumpet X. A. 4.2.8, ἀκούσαντες τὸν θόρυβον hearing the noise 4. 4. 21, ἀκροώμενοι τοῦ ᾄδοντος listening to the singer X. C. 1.3.10, ὅσοι ἀλλήλων ξυνί_εσαν all who understood each other T. 1.3, ἐπειδὰν συνι_ῇ τις τὰ λεγόμενα when one understands what is said P. Pr. 325c (verbs of understanding, συνι_έναι and ἐπίστασθαι, usually take the accus.), κρομμύων ὀσφραίνομαι I smell onions Ar. Ran. 654.

a. A supplementary participle is often used in agreement with the genitive of the person from whom something is heard: λέγοντος ἐμοῦ ἀκροά_σονται οἱ νέοι the young men will listen when I speak P. A. 37d.

b. The accusative is almost always used when the thing heard is expressed by a substantivized neuter adjective or participle, but the genitive plural in the case of οὗτος, ὅδε, αὐτός, and ὅς is frequent.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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