Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
1322

The genitive of an explicit word may explain the meaning of a more general word.

Ἰ_λίου πόλις E 642, as urbs Romae, ἄελλαι παντοίων ἀνέμων blasts formed of winds of every sort ε 292. This construction is chiefly poetic, but in prose we find ὑὸς μέγα χρῆμα a monster (great affair, cross1294) of a boar Hdt. 1.36, τὸ ὄρος τῆς Ἰστώνης Mt. Istone T. 4.46 (very rare, 1142 c). An articular infinitive in the genitive often defines the application of a substantive: ἀμαθία_ ἡ τοῦ οἴεσθαι εἰδέναι α· οὐκ οἶδεν the ignorance of thinking one knows what one does not know P. A. 29b.

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a. But with ὄνομα the person or thing named is usually in apposition to ὄνομα: τῷ δὲ νεωτάτῳ ἐθέμην ὄνομα Καλλίστρατον I gave the youngest the name Callistratus D. 43.74.


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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