Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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GENITIVE OF QUALITY 1320

The genitive to denote quality occurs chiefly as a predicate.

ἐὼν τρόπου ἡσυχίου being of a peaceful disposition Hdt. 1.107, οἱ δέ τινες τῆς αὐτῆς γνώμης ὀλίγοι κατέφυγον but some few of the same opinion fled T. 3.70, ταῦτα παμπόλλων ἐστὶ λόγων this calls for a thorough discussion P. L. 642a, θεωρήσατ' αὐτόν, μὴ ὁποτέρου τοῦ λόγου, ἀλλ' ὁποτέρου τοῦ βίου ἐστίν consider, not the manner of his speech, but the manner of his life Aes. 3.168, εἰ δοκεῖ ταῦτα καὶ δαπάνης μεγάλης καὶ πόνων πολλῶν καὶ πρα_γματεία_ς εἶναι if these matters seem to involve great expense and much toil and trouble D. 8.48.

a. The attributive use occurs in poetry: χόρτων εὐδένδρων Εὐρώπα_ς Europe with its pastures amid fair trees E. I. T. 134, λευκῆς χιόνος πτέρυξ a wing white as snow (of white snow) S. Ant. 114.

1321

The use of the genitive to express quality, corresponding to the Latin genitive, occurs in the non-predicate position, only when age or size is exactly expressed by the addition of a numeral (genitive of measure, cross1325). The Latin genitive of quality in mulier mirae pulchritudinis is expressed by γυνὴ θαυμασία_ κάλλος (or τοῦ κάλλους), γυνὴ θαυμασία_ ἰδεῖν, γυνὴ ἔχουσα θαυμάσιον σχῆμα, etc.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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