Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

1241

Distinction between οὗτος and ὅδε.—ὅδε hic points with emphasis to an object in the immediate (actual or mental) vicinity of the speaker, or to something just noticed. In the drama it announces the approach of a new actor. ὅδε is even used of the speaker himself as the demonstrative of the first person ( cross1242). οὗτος iste may refer to a person close at hand, but less vividly, as in statements in regard to a person concerning whom a question has been asked. When ὅδε and οὗτος are contrasted, ὅδε refers to the more important, οὗτος to the less important, object. Thus, ἀλλ' ὅδε βασιλεὺς χωρεῖ but lo! here comes the king S. Ant. 155, αὕτη πέλας σοῦ here she (the person you ask for) is near thee S. El. 1474, καὶ ταῦτ' ἀκούειν κἄ_τι τῶνδ' ἀλγί_ονα so that we obey both in these things and in things yet more grievous S. Ant. 64. See also cross1245. οὗτος has a wider range of use than the other demonstratives.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic