Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1195

Homer uses ἕο, οἷ, etc., as personal pronouns ( = αὐτοῦ, αὐτῷ, etc., in Attic), in which case they are enclitic: διὰ μαντοσύνην, τήν οἱ πόρε Φοῖβος by the art of divination, which Phoebus gave to him A 72. Homer also uses ἕο, οἷ, etc., either as direct ( = ἑαυτοῦ, etc., cross1218) or as indirect reflexives ( = αὐτοῦ, etc., cross1225). In the former case they are orthotone; in the latter, either enclitic or orthotone. Thus, ο παῖδα ἐοικότα γείνατο he begat a son like unto himself E 800, οὔ τινά φησιν ὁμοῖον οἶ ἔμεναι Δαναῶν he says there is no one of the Danaans like unto himself I 306. Hdt. agrees with Hom. except that εὗ, οἷ are not direct reflexives and orthotone; σφίσι (not σφί) is reflexive.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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