Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1178

οὗτος, ὅδε, ἐκεῖνος sometimes omit the article.

a. Regularly, when the noun is in the predicate: αὕτη ἔστω ἱκανὴ ἀπολογία_ let this be a sufficient defence P. A. 24b, οἶμαι ἐμὴν ταύτην πατρίδα εἶναι I think this is my native country X. A. 4.8.4.

b. Usually, with proper names, except when anaphoric ( cross1120 b): ἐκεῖνος Θουκυ_δίδης that (well-known) Thucydides Ar. Ach. 708.

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c. Usually, with definite numbers: ταύτα_ς τριά_κοντα μνᾶς these thirty minae D. 27.23.

d. Optionally, when a relative clause follows: ἐπὶ γῆν τήνδε ἤλθομεν, ἐν ᾗ οἱ πατέρες ἡμῶν Μήδων ἐκράτησαν we have come against this land, in which our fathers conquered the Medes T. 2.74.

e. In the phrase (often contemptuous) οὗτος ἀνήρ P. G. 505c; and in other expressions denoting some emotion: ἄνθρωπος οὑτοσί_ D. 18.243.

f. Sometimes, when the demonstrative follows its noun: ἐπίγραμμα τόδε T. 6.59. So often in Hdt.

g. Frequently, in poetry.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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