Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].

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1094

Adverbs are of two kinds

a. Ordinary adverbs, denoting manner, degree, time, place, etc. Ordinary adverbs qualify verbs, adjectives, other adverbs, and (rarely) substantives: ὄπισθεν γενόμενος getting behind X. A. 1.8.24, εὐθὺς ἐβόα_ straightway he shouted 1. 8. 1, φανερὸν ἤδη already clear L. 4.6, πολὺ θᾶττον much more quickly X. A. 1.5.2, εὖ μάλα very easily 6. 1. 1, εἰκότως τρόπον τινά in a way reasonably D. 8.41, μάλα συμφορά_ a great misfortune X. C. 4.2.5, μάλα στρατηγός an excellent general X. H. 6.2.39.

b. Sentence adverbs (or particles) are adverbs that affect the sentence as a whole or give emphasis to particular words of any kind. Greek has many sentence adverbs, some of which are treated more fully under Particles.

Such are words of interrogation (ἦ, ἆρα, μῶν); of affirmation and confidence (δή now, indeed, δῆτα surely, γέ at least, even, really, μήν in truth, νή surely,

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τοί surely); of uncertainty (ἴσως, πού, τάχα perhaps); of negation (οὐ, μή, οὔτοι, μήτοι, etc.); of limitation (ἄν 1761 ff.).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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