Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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3028

Hyperbaton (ὑπέρβατον transposition) is the separation of words naturally belonging together. Such displacement usually gives prominence to the first of two words thus separated, but sometimes to the second also. In prose hyperbaton is less common than in poetry, but even in prose it is frequent, especially when it secures emphasis on an important idea by placing it at the beginning or end of a sentence. At times hyperbaton may mark passionate excitement. Sometimes it was adopted to gain rhythmical effect. Thus: “Such resting found the sole of unblest feet”: Milton.

σὺ δὲ αὐτός, ὦ πρὸς θεῶν, Μένων, τί φῂς ἀρετὴν εἶναι; but what do you yourself, in heaven's name, Meno, say virtue is? P. Men. 71d, ὦ πρός σε γονάτων ( cross946) by thy knees (I entreat) thee E. Med. 324, ὑφ' ἑνὸς τοιαῦτα πέπονθεν ἡ Ἑλλὰς ἀνθρώπου from one man Greece endured such sufferings D. 18.158, κρατῶν τοὺς ὁποιουσδήποθ' ὑ_μεῖς ἐξεπέμπετε στρατηγούς conquering the generals you kept sending out—such as they were 18. 146.

a. The displacement is often caused by the intrusion of a clause of contrast or explanation. Thus τοὺς περὶ Ἀρχία_ν . . . οὐ ψῆφον ἀνεμείνατε ἀλλ' . . . ἐτι_μωρήσασθε you did not postpone your vote but took vengeance upon Archias and his company X. H. 7.3.7.

b. Adverbs and particles may be displaced. Thus, οὕτω τις ἔρως δεινός a passion so terrible P. Th. 169c, πολὺ γὰρ τῶν ἵππων ἔτρεχον θᾶττον for they ran much faster than the horses X. A. 1.5.2; so εὖ, μάλα; on ἄν see cross1764.

c. Prepositions often cause the displacement ( cross1663, cross2690). On displacement in connection with participles see cross1166, cross1167; with the negatives, see cross2690 ff.

d. Similar or contrasted words are often brought into juxtaposition. Here a nominative precedes an oblique case. Thus, ἀπὸ τῶν ὑ_μετέρων ὑ_μῖν πολεμεῖ συμμάχων he wages war on you from the resources of your allies D. 4.34, οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται for no one shall chase me by force, he willing me unwilling H 197. Note ἄλλος ἄλλο (ἄλλοθεν, ἄλλοτε, etc.), αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ.

e. Construction ἀπὸ κοινοῦ.—In poetry an attributive genitive or an object, common to two coördinate words, is often placed with the second only, as φράζων ἅλωσιν Ἰ_λίου τ' ἀνάστασιν telling of the capture and overthrow of Ilium A. Ag. 587.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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