Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2973

τὲ . . . τέ usually serves to connect clauses, less frequently single words. In English and often suffices, but as . . . so is often in place. τὲ . . . τέ is more common in poetry than in prose, but in prose more common than τέ standing alone. Thus, πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε father of men and gods A 544, ἐμοί τε γὰρ πολέμιοι Ἀσσύριοι, σοί τε νῦν ἐχθί_ονές εἰσιν ἢ ἐμοί for the Assyrians are enemies to me, and they are now more hostile to you than to me X. C. 4.5.23, περὶ ὧν εἰδέναι τε κάλλιστον μὴ εἰδέναι τε αἴσχιστον knowledge of which is most excellent and ignorance most disgraceful P. G. 472c.

a. One clause may be negative, the other affirmative (T. 2.22); but we usually have οὔτε instead of τὲ οὐ.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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