Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2968

τέ alone sometimes in prose links whole clauses or sentences which serve to explain, amplify, supplement, or to denote a consequence of, what precedes (and thus, and therefore, and as a result). Thus, ὁ δ' ἐχαλέπαινεν . . ., ἐκέλευσέ τ' αὐτὸν ἐκ τοῦ μέσου ἐξίστασθαι but he was angry and (therefore) ordered him to get out of the way X. A. 1.5.14. Cp. cross2978.

a. This use of τέ (τέ consequential) is quite common in Herodotus and Thucydides, rather rare in Xenophon, and infrequent in other prose writers. It occurs also in poetry.

N.—In poetry τέ alone (cp. -que) often connects single parallel nouns and pronouns so that the two connected ideas form a whole; as σκῆπτρον τι_μά_ς τε sceptre and prerogatives A. Pr. 171. In prose, participles and infinitives are occasionally linked by τέ; as καθαρωτέρα_ οὖσα πρεπόντως τε μᾶλλον ἠμφιεσμένη being fairer and dressed more becomingly X. O. 10.12.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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