Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

2983

Position of τέ.—τέ usually follows the word with which the sentence or sentence-part to be connected is most concerned. Apart from many irregularities there are certain exceptions to this rule which are commonly observed.

a. τέ may come between two words which go closely together, as between article (preposition, attributive genitive) and its noun. Thus, τό τε βαρβαρικὸν καὶ τὸ Ἑλληνικόν the barbarian and the Greek force X. A. 1.2.1, εἶμι πρός τε λουτρὰ καὶ λειμῶνας I will go to the bathing places and the meadows S. Aj. 654 (for πρὸς λουτρά τε). But ἡ πόλις. τε καὶ ἡμεῖς οἱ νόμοι the State and we the laws P. Cr. 53a.

-- 669 --

b. τέ connecting an entire clause stands as near as possible to the beginning. Cp. X. A. 1.8.3.

c. τέ may stand after a word or expression which, though common to two members of a clause, is placed either at the beginning (especially after a preposition) or in the second member. Thus, ἅ τε δεῖ φίλια καὶ (ἃ δεῖ) πολέμια ἡμᾶς νομίζειν what we must consider as belonging to our friends and what to our enemies X. C. 5.2.21, ἔν τε τῷ θερμοτέρῳ καὶ ψυ_χροτέρῳ in the hotter and colder P. Phil. 24b, ἅπα_σι φίλον ἄνδρα τε σοφώτατον a man dear to all and most wise Ar. Vesp. 1277.

d. The freer position of τέ is often due to the fact that several words are taken as forming a single notion. Thus, ἡ καλλίστη δὴ πολι_τεία_ τε καὶ ὁ κάλλιστος ἀνήρ the very noblest constitution and the noblest man P. R. 562a.

Previous Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic