Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2981

τὲ . . . δέ is used when a writer begins as if he were going simply to add the second member (both . . . and), but instead contrasts it with the first. This combination of copulative and adversative particles is often rendered less harsh by the form of the δέ clause and by other reasons. (a) The δέ clause contains a καί; as ἅμα (ἔπειτα, ἔτι, πολλαχοῦ, ὡσαύτως) δὲ καί; e.g. ἔν τε τῇ τῶν ἐπῶν ποιήσει πολλαχοῦ δὲ καὶ ἄλλοθι, lit. both in the construction of epic poetry but also in many other cases P. R. 394c. (b) The second clause contains a formula with δέ but not with καί; as ἔτι δέ, τί δέ, τὸ δὲ κεφάλαιον, μετὰ δὲ ταῦτα. Thus, πρότερόν τε . . . νῦν δέ (both) formerly . . . but now X. H. 7.1.24. Cp. P. L. 664b, 947 a, 967 d. (c) After a considerable interval occasioned by the extension of the τέ clause, it is natural to resume with δέ. So T. 6.83. 1, X. A. 7.8.11, X. C. 2.1.22, L. 2.17.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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