Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2959

δ' οὖν but certainly, at all events, anyhow, be that as it may with or without μέν in the preceding clause. Here οὖν shows that an unquestionable fact is to be set forth in its own clause; while the adversative δέ marks opposition to what has preceded and implies that the foregoing statement is uncertain and liable to dispute: ‘be that true or not, at any rate what follows is certainly true.’ δ' οὖν is used (a) to set aside conjecture, surmise, or hearsay; (b) to resume the main argument after long digression, and to cut short further discussion and come to the point; (c), with imperatives, to denote assent marked by unwillingness, impatience, or indifference. Thus, (a) εἰ μὲν δὴ δίκαια ποιήσω, οὐκ οἶδα· αἱρήσομαι δ' οὖν ὑ_μᾶς whether I shall do what is right (or not), I do not know; be that as it may, I will choose you X. A. 1.3.5, καὶ ἐλέγετο Κύ_ρω δοῦναι

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πολλὰ χρήματα. τῇ δ' οὖν στρατιᾷ τότε ἀπέδωκε Κῦρος μισθὸν τεττάρων μηνῶν and she is said to have given Cyrus a large sum; at any rate Cyrus then gave the army four months' pay 1. 2. 12; (b) cp. T. 1.3, 6. 15, 8. 81. Resumptive δ' οὖν may also set aside doubtful statements. (c) σὺ δ' οὖν λέγε, εἴ σοι τῷ λόγῳ τις ἡδονή well speak on then, if thou hast delight in speaking S. El. 891, ἔστω δ' οὖν ὅπως ὑ_μῖν φίλον however, be it as you wish S. O. C. 1205.

ει' δ' οὖν = but if indeed, but if in point of fact; as εἰ δ' οὖν τι κἀ_κτρέποιτο τοῦ πρόσθεν λόγου but if he should deviate at all from his former statement S. O. T. 851.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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