Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

2836

Copulative δέ marks transition, and is the ordinary particle used in connecting successive clauses or sentences which add something new or different, but not opposed, to what precedes, and are not joined by other particles, such as γάρ or οὖν.

Copulative δέ is common in marking continuation, especially when something subordinate is added. Thus, when a new phase of a narrative is developed (X. A. 1.2.7-8); where attention is called to a new point or person (as in τί δ' ἔστιν;); when an interrupted speech or narrative is resumed (X. C. 1.6.41, S. Tr. 281); where a second relationship is added (μήτηρ βασιλέως, βασίλεια δ' ἐμή the mother of the King, and my Queen A. Pers. 151, Ἠιόνα . . . Μενδαίων ἀποικία_ν, πολεμία_ν δὲ οὖσαν he seized Eïon, a colony of Mende, and which had been hostile T. 4.7);

-- 645 --

when δέ has a force like that of γάρ (X. C. 6.3.16); and in καὶ . . . δέ and also (Epic καὶ δέ), 2891.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic