Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2789

ἄρα is used in Homer much more freely than in Attic, and often so as to defy exact translation. In general ἄρα in Epic marks immediate connection and succession, a natural consequence of something already said or done; gives an explanation of an antecedent statement; or is used in recapitulations and transitions. Thus, αὐτὰρ ἐπεί ἤγερθεν . . ., βῆ ἴμεν εἰς ἀγορήν but when they were collected, then he started to go to the assembly β 9, ὣς ἔφαθ', οἱ δ' ἄρα πάντες ἀκὴν ἐγένοντο σιωπῇ thus he spake, and all accordingly became hushed in silence H 92, σῖτον δέ σφιν ἔνειμε Μεσαύλιος, ὅν ῥα συβώτης αὐτὸς ἐκτήσατο and Mesaulius distributed food to them, a slave whom (and this was the reason for his so doing) the swineherd had acquired ξ 449, ὣς ἄρ' ἐφώνησεν καὶ ἀπὸ ἕο τόξον ἔθηκεν thus then he spake and put the bow from him φ 163. So also in the later language; as ἐρωτήσης δὲ αὐτὸν τῆς μητρὸς . . . ἀπεκρί_νατο ἄρα ὁ Κῦρος on his mother's questioning him Cyrus naturally replied X. C. 1.3.2.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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